Linda McMahon

“Bad Decision-Making on Steroids”

Trump’s Administrator of the Small Business Administration

Linda McMahon is President Donald Trump’s Administrator of the Small Business Administration. A friend and benefactor of more than thirty years to President Trump, McMahon is the former CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and was a twice-failed candidate for the U.S. Senate in Connecticut. Throughout her career in choreographed fighting and as a losing political candidate, McMahon has demonstrated that she is far more interested in looking out for her own bottom line than for the well-being of her employees. Whether it’s failing to pay workers of her unsuccessful Senate campaign or treating the men and woman who made her wrestling company a billion-dollar empire like independent contractors to avoid paying for health and retirement benefits, McMahon has never had the best interests of workers in mind.


McMahon Is Married to “Billionaire WWE Promoter, Vincent McMahon”

McMahon is a “North Carolina native” who “graduated from East Carolina University with a bachelor’s of science degree in French.” She “is the wife of billionaire WWE promoter, Vincent McMahon,” with whom she built WWE “into a controversial empire of raunchy, butt-whupping entertainment.” McMahon began her career working an entry-level job “at the internationally renowned Covington & Burling law firm in 1969,” where she studied “intellectual property, which turned out to play a key role in her success with WWE.”

  • “McMahon is a graduate of East Carolina University. She and her husband, Vince, have two adult children and six grandchildren.” [“About Linda,” Linda McMahon personal website, accessed January 9, 2017.]
  • “Vince and Linda McMahon–the couple who built WWF into a controversial empire of raunchy, butt-whupping entertainment–are Carolinas natives, small-town kids who hit the big time. The McMahons were both born in Havelock, a town of 22,000 smack next to the Cherry Point Marine base. They grew up in Eastern North Carolina, attended a Baptist church, where she sang in the choir.” McMahon “was an only child, a longtime Girl Scout, mature, responsible, an academic overachiever who finished college in three years.” [Charlotte Observer, October 22, 1999.]
  • “McMahon began working at the internationally renowned Covington & Burling law firm in 1969. She was hired at an entry-level, but quickly proved her value to the firm by translating correspondence from French to English . . . McMahon’s work at Covington & Burling allowed her to study intellectual property, which turned out to play a key role in her success with WWE.”“By 1972, Linda and Vince McMahon moved from Washington, D.C. to New Britain, Connecticut as Vince was just cutting his teeth as a promoter.”“The McMahon family–which included nine-year-old Shane and three-year-old Stephanie–then moved to South Yarmouth, Massachusetts in 1979 after purchasing the Cape Cod Coliseum.” [Justin Barrasso, “Linda McMahon on Her Role with WWE and Women’s Leadership LIVE,” Sports Illustrated, June 20, 2016.]

The McMahons Built WWE Into a Publicly Traded Company Worth $1.5 Billion

McMahon co-founded World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), formerly the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), “with her husband, Vincent K. McMahon, the company’s flamboyant chairman.” They built WWE out of Capitol Wrestling, “the company they purchased from Vince’s father in 1982.” WWE is a “publicly traded company” that currently “has a market value of about $1.5 billion.”

  • McMahon founded World Wrestling Entertainment, “formerly the World Wrestling Federation, more than twenty-five years ago with her husband, Vincent K. McMahon, the company’s flamboyant chairman.”“As Linda E. McMahon and her husband built a small family business into the billion-dollar empire of World Wrestling Entertainment, she was more than its chief executive: she was sometimes a character in its wrestling matches’ soap-opera style story lines involving family quarrels, infidelity and, of course, mock violence.” [Raymond Hernandez, “A Senate Candidate Accustomed to Being Thrown in the Ring,” New York Times, October 4, 2009.]
  • McMahon is the “co-founder and former chief executive officer of WWE, based in Stamford, Connecticut. She stepped down as CEO in 2009 to run for the U.S. Senate.” [“About Linda,” Linda McMahon personal website, accessed January 9, 2017.]

McMahon Made a Fortune Running WWE but You Can’t Ask Her Former Employees About the Job She Did Because They Had to Sign Non-Disclosure Agreements

McMahon, who “personally owns $84 million in WWE stock,” served as the company’s CEO from 1997 until September 2009, when she stepped down for her first of two failed U.S. Senate campaigns. “Many of her former associates” were “reluctant to discuss her management style, her role at the company or her legacy at the WWE, where all employees must sign non-disclosure agreements.”

  • “Much like the corporate headquarters of the WWE, an imposing one-way glass structure visible from Interstate 95 in Stamford, Linda McMahon’s record as the company’s chief executive is opaque.” While McMahon campaigned for a U.S. Senate seat in 2012, “many of her former associates” were “reluctant to discuss her management style, her role at the company or her legacy at the WWE, where all employees must sign non-disclosure agreements.” [Neil Vigdor and Brian Lockhart, “At WWE, McMahon Blended Cunning with Kindness,” Stamford (CT) Advocate, November 5, 2012.]]

McMahon Took Tax Benefits to Pad WWE’s Bottom Line While Laying Off Workers

McMahon “announced plans to lay off 10 percent of its workforce” in January 2009. WWE “received about $37 million in state tax credits for staging and recording its wrestling spectacles,” beginning in July 2009, just months after McMahon announced the layoffs.

Three of the twenty tax credits awarded to WWE, which were “aimed at attracting movies and new media to the state” and covered “up to 30 percent of production costs,” and “totaled more than $5 million each in 2010, 2011 and 2012.” 

McMahon was criticized “for cynically accepting tax benefits to beef up her bottom line, cutting jobs while she and her husband,” who continued to run WWE, “took home $46 million in dividends.”

  • In January 2009, McMahon “announced plans to lay off 10 percent of its workforce, about sixty jobs, in a cost-reduction plan.” Starting in July 2009, “WWE received fourteen of the tax credits, totaling about $9,828,603.” McMahon resigned as WWE CEO in September 2009. [Ken Dixon, “WWE Received $37M in Tax Credits,” Connecticut Post, October 19, 2012.]
  • In October 2012, the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) reported that WWE “received about $37 million in state tax credits for staging and recording its wrestling spectacles dating back to July of 2009.” The DECD “indicated that the WWE has received twenty separate tax credits totaling $36.7 million.” [Ken Dixon, “WWE Received $37M in Tax Credits,” Connecticut Post, October 19, 2012.]
  • “Three of the twenty credits, awarded as part of state legislation aimed at fostering film, TV, and digital production in the state, totaled more than $5 million each in 2010, 2011 and 2012.” The “credits were granted, without strings, based on how much money the WWE had spent in Connecticut on producing its events.” [Ken Dixon, “WWE Received $37M in Tax Credits,” Connecticut Post, October 19, 2012.]
  • “‘There are no job creation or retention requirements for them to earn the credits,’” said Jim Watson, spokesman for the DECD. [Ken Dixon, “WWE Received $37M in Tax Credits,” Connecticut Post, October 19, 2012.]
  • The tax credits, “aimed at attracting movies and new media to the state,” cover “up to 30 percent of production costs.” [Ken Dixon, “WWE Received $37M in Tax Credits,” Connecticut Post, October 19, 2012.]
  • “The DECD information was released a day after a leaked document from the WWE indicated that the company. . . had reached a $4.4 million settlement over taxes with the state Department of Revenue Services.” [Ken Dixon, “WWE Received $37M in Tax Credits,” Connecticut Post, October 19, 2012.]
  • McMahon’s 2012 Senate opponent, Chris Murphy, “criticize[d] McMahon for cynically accepting tax benefits to beef up her bottom line, cutting jobs while she and her husband, Vince McMahon, who continues to run the company, took home $46 million in dividends.” [Ken Dixon, “WWE Received $37M in Tax Credits,” Connecticut Post, October 19, 2012.]

Under McMahon, WWE Sought Government Assistance and Clashed with State over Taxes

WWE applied for state economic assistance through the “Next Five” program, a Connecticut “program for major employers who promise to create at least two hundred new jobs.” The company planned to invest “in the establishment of a new television network for WWE programming.”

  • In October 2012, WWE “applied to the administration of Gov. Dannel P. Malloy for economic assistance in its ‘Next Five’ program for major employers who promise to create at least two hundred new jobs.” The company was seeking assistance as it invested “in the establishment of a new television network for WWE programming.” [Mark Pazniokas, “WWE Applies to Malloy Administration for “Next Five” Assistance,” Connecticut Mirror, October 18, 2012.]

In April 2012, WWE “paid a $4.4 million tax settlement to the state of Connecticut” after clashing with state “officials over taxes owed.” The dispute “arose over whether the company qualified for broadcaster exemption, which would have significantly reduced its tax liabilities.”

WWE’s chief financial officer said that the company receives about half its revenue from broadcasting, but state officials asserted it did not qualify for the special designation.” When a leaked, internal tax document was made public in October 2012, revealing the settlement, Democrats slammed McMahon for her “‘pattern of cheating the system to benefit herself and billionaires like her.’”

McMahon’s critics said the leaked documents painted “‘a disturbing picture of a greedy CEO who cheated the state of Connecticut out of more than $4 million and didn’t own up to her company’s financial responsibilities until caught.’”

  • An internal tax document was made public in October 2012 revealing the settlement, whereupon the campaign of McMahon’s 2012 Senate opponent, Chris Murphy, called it “‘just the latest example highlighting Republican wrestling CEO Linda McMahon’s pattern of cheating the system to benefit herself and billionaires like her.’” [Alexander Bolton, “McMahon’s Wrestling Company Paid $4.4 Million to Settle Tax Dispute,” The Hill, October 18, 2012.]
  • “The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) also hit McMahon on the tax disclosure. ‘These documents paint a disturbing picture of a greedy CEO who cheated the state of Connecticut out of more than $4 million and didn’t own up to her company’s financial responsibilities until caught,’” said a DSCC spokesman. [Alexander Bolton, “McMahon’s Wrestling Company Paid $4.4 Million to Settle Tax Dispute,” The Hill, October 18, 2012.]
  • “George Barrios, the chief financial officer of WWE, said the settlement represented a compromise between the company and the state over how to classify corporate revenues.” He called the press release put out by Murphy’s campaign on the issue “‘slanderous, absolutely untrue,’” and said that “‘the state certainly doesn’t feel we were cheating on our taxes. We know we weren’t. It’s just a fairly typical process of calculating taxes across all these municipalities and also abroad.’” [Alexander Bolton, “McMahon’s Wrestling Company Paid $4.4 Million to Settle Tax Dispute,” The Hill, October 18, 2012.]
  • “The dispute between WWE and tax officials arose over whether the company qualified for broadcaster exemption, which would have significantly reduced its tax liabilities. Barrios said the company receives about half its revenue from broadcasting, but state officials asserted it did not qualify for the special designation.” [Alexander Bolton, “McMahon’s Wrestling Company Paid $4.4 Million to Settle Tax Dispute,” The Hill, October 18, 2012.]

McMahon Was Accused of Outsourcing Jobs to Other Countries to Produce WWE Merchandise, Instead of Using Connecticut- or American-Based Companies

McMahon was accused “of outsourcing jobs to foreign countries by having WWE merchandise, such as toys and clothing, manufactured overseas.” WWE “used overseas firms instead of Connecticut-based companies to manufacture some of its merchandise.” For example, WWE had “a licensing agreement with toymaker Mattel Inc.,” which manufactured the company’s licensed toys overseas, “in places like China.” Mattel’s last “U.S. factories closed in 2002.”

  • During McMahon’s 2010 Senate campaign, “members of the Connecticut AFL-CIO accused McMahon of outsourcing jobs to foreign countries by having WWE merchandise, such as toys and clothing, manufactured overseas.”John Olsen, president of the Connecticut AFL-CIO, “said he’s personally annoyed by McMahon’s recent TV ad featuring her with a metal lunch box [made overseas] and talking about the need to fight for jobs. Olsen said Stamford-based WWE has used overseas firms instead of Connecticut-based companies to manufacture some of its merchandise.”“WWE has a licensing agreement with toymaker Mattel Inc.,” which manufactures the company’s licensed toys “overseas in places like China.” [Susan Haigh, “Dem, Unions Bash McMahon, WWE in Conn. Senate Race,” Seattle Times, September 22, 2010.]
  • As of 2010, WWE sells “merchandising and licensing rights to corporations such as Mattel.” Mattel’s last “U.S. factories closed in 2002.” [Joseph Cole, “Linda McMahon States Her Case in Seymour,” New Haven (CT) Independent, February 26, 2010.]

Under McMahon, WWE Was Sued for $110 Million by a Former Performer Who Said the Company Tried “To Intimidate Her Into Performing Obscene and Dangerous Acts”

“Rena Mero, known to wrestling fans as Sable,” “filed a $110 million lawsuit against” the World Wrestling Federation, later known as WWE. Mero alleged that McMahon’s company tried “to intimidate her into performing obscene and dangerous acts” and forced her “to give up her championship belt after she repeatedly refused to have her gown torn off and her breasts exposed on national TV.”

  • Rena Mero ,known to wrestling fans as Sable,” “filed a $110 million lawsuit against Titan Sports Inc., better known as the World Wrestling Federation, alleging the WWF sought to intimidate her into performing obscene and dangerous acts. The suit alleges the WWF forced Mero to give up her championship belt after she repeatedly refused to have her gown torn off and her breasts exposed on national TV.” [“Sable Blows Her Top,” People online, February 23, 1999, accessed January 9, 2017.]
  • The suit was settled in August 1999. [Jason Clevett, “WWE, Sable Part Ways,” Slam! Sports, August 11, 2004, accessed January 9, 2017.]

Despite Running a Billion-Dollar Wrestling Empire, McMahon Claims to “Have Shared the Experiences of Our Nation’s Small Business Owners.”

  • On December 7, 2016, McMahon posted on Facebook, “I am honored and humbled to be appointed by President-elect Trump to serve as head of the U.S. Small Business Administration. As an entrepreneur myself, I have shared the experiences of our nation’s small business owners and will do my best to advocate on their behalf.” [Linda McMahon Facebook page, status of December 7, 2016 (4:27 pm), accessed January 9, 2017.]

McMahon Is Worth About $500 Million While Her Husband Is Worth “A Staggering $1.16 Billion”

McMahon’s “personal net worth has been valued at some $500 million” and the value of her “personal stock in the company is estimated to be about $84 million.” Her husband’s net worth is estimated “to be a staggering $1.16 billion.”

During her first failed Senate campaign, McMahon released tax returns “showing she and her husband earned $30.6 million in 2010.” The “vast majority” of their income “came from stock dividends.” According to a 2009 candidate disclosure report, which covered a 21-month period through October 2009, McMahon and her husband had “between $103.7 million and $335.1 million in assets” and “had income of $8.97 million to $28.34 million from all sources, including World Wrestling Entertainment Inc., where Linda McMahon was CEO” until November 2009. McMahon’s “salary as head of World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. was $871,154” for the reporting period.

  • During her 2010 Senate campaign, McMahon released “returns showing she and her husband earned $30.6 million in 2010.” According to the returns, “the vast majority of the income for McMahon and her husband Vince, the CEO and president of WWE, formerly World Wrestling Entertainment, came from stock dividends. The Greenwich couple paid $4.7 million in federal taxes.”According to the 2010 returns, “McMahon and her husband earned $29.6 million from stock dividends. Much of their income was taxed at 15 percent, the taxation rate for dividends.”The “couple earned $827,520 in wages and salaries,” most of which “includes Vince McMahon’s salary at WWE.” According to McMahon’s campaign spokesman, Tim Murtaugh, “McMahon earned $155,000 for her involvement in a movie production venture with her son and daughter-in-law.” The McMahons also “made $122,000 in charitable gifts, in addition to the $1.6 million the couple’s charitable foundation gave to groups ranging from the Make A Wish Foundation to the Boys and Girls Clubs of America.” [Susan Haigh, “McMahon Releases 2010 Tax Returns,” Norwich (CT) Bulletin, July 20, 2012.]
  • According to her candidate disclosure report, which covered January 1, 2008, through October 15, 2009, McMahon and her husband had “between $103.7 million and $335.1 million in assets,” which “includes stocks, bonds, mutual funds, bank accounts and other holdings.” [“Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010.]
  • According to her candidate disclosure report, which covered January 1, 2008, through October 15, 2009, McMahon and her husband “had income of $8.97 million to $28.34 million from all sources, including World Wrestling Entertainment Inc., where Linda McMahon was CEO” until November 2009. “The bulk of their income came from dividends, capital gains, interest and other earnings from investment holdings such as stocks and bonds.” McMahon’s disclosure report showed “roughly 1,000 different assets that are publicly traded.” [“Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010.]
  • According to her candidate disclosure report, which covered January 1, 2008, through October 15, 2009, McMahon’s “salary as head of World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. was $871,154 for the roughly 21-month period.” [“Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010.]
  • According to her candidate disclosure report, which covered January 1, 2008, through October 15, 2009, McMahon’s World Wrestling Entertainment stock was “valued at $5,000,001 to $25 million and provided income of $100,001 to $1 million in the reporting period.” [“Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010.]
  • On Tuesday, October 19, 1999, the WWF “offered 10 million shares of its stock . . . at $17 each, above the expected range of $14 to $16.” “Despite dire cautions in the WWF offering’s papers, eager investors drove the stock price as high as $34. WWF stock closed its first day at $25.25.” Linda and Vince McMahon “kept nearly 57 million shares for themselves” and “were about $1.4 billion richer by Tuesday evening.” Over the next couple days, WWF shares “lost about 15 percent of their value.” [Charlotte Observer, October 22, 1999.]

McMahon Owns a 10-Acre Compound Valued at Nearly $12 Million in Greenwich, Connecticut

McMahon owns a 10-acre Greenwich property, “valued at $11.8 million,” in Conyers Farm, “one of the most exclusive gated communities in Connecticut.” The “main house” on the property has a total of fourteen rooms, with “seven bedrooms, seven full baths and two half-baths.”

  • In February 1985, McMahon and her husband “had left the hard times far behind and purchased their” home in the exclusive Conyers Farm section of Greenwich.” Their “10-acre property is valued at $11.8 million.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • “There are two dwellings on the property, a main house and an apartment over a standalone garage. It has fourteen total rooms, seven bedrooms, seven full baths and two half baths.” [“Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010.]

McMahon Also Bought a Nearly 4,000-Square-Foot Penthouse Duplex at a Luxury Tower in Stamford, Connecticut, Named . . . Trump Parc

McMahon “paid $4.1 million in October for a 3,900-square-foot penthouse duplex unit at Trump Parc,” a “high-profile luxury tower” in Stamford, Connecticut, which was developed by Donald Trump. The McMahons purchased the largest penthouse unit in the building, even though the couple had “no intention of moving to Stamford.” McMahon’s spokesman “said he did not know how the apartment would be used.”

  • In 2009, McMahon and her husband “paid $4.1 million in October for a 3,900-square-foot penthouse duplex unit at Trump Parc,” a “high-profile luxury tower” in Stamford, Connecticut. The McMahons purchased the largest penthouse unit in the building. [Elizabeth Kim, “McMahons Buy $4 Million Penthouse at Trump Parc in Stamford,” Connecticut Post, March 1, 2010.]
  • “At thirty-four stories, Trump Parc at Washington Boulevard and Broad Street has redefined the downtown skyline as the city’s tallest building. The residential project, developed by Thomas Rich, Louis Capelli, and Donald Trump, opened in September with hopes that it would add housing and contribute to the ongoing revitalization of downtown Stamford.” [Elizabeth Kim, “McMahons Buy $4 Million Penthouse at Trump Parc in Stamford,” Connecticut Post, March 1, 2010.]
  • According to McMahon’s spokesman, the couple had “no intention of moving to Stamford” and planned to continue living in Greenwich. Her spokesman “said he did not know how the apartment would be used.” [Elizabeth Kim, “McMahons Buy $4 Million Penthouse at Trump Parc in Stamford,” Connecticut Post, March 1, 2010.]

In 2010, McMahon Owned Seven Properties Worth Millions of Dollars

McMahon owned “a total of seven properties” in 2010: “two Stamford condominiums; a house and condominium in Greenwich; a vacation home in Boca Raton, Fla.; a condominium in Las Vegas, Nev.; and a property in Pennsylvania.” These include “a 4,365-square-foot Greenwich townhouse assessed at $3.13 million” and “an oceanfront condominium in Boca Raton purchased for $2.145 million.”

  • As of March 2010, the “McMahons own a total of seven properties: two Stamford condominiums; a house and condominium in Greenwich; a vacation home in Boca Raton, Fla.; a condominium in Las Vegas, Nev.; and a property in Pennsylvania.” [Elizabeth Kim, “McMahons Buy $4 Million Penthouse at Trump Parc in Stamford,” Connecticut Post, March 1, 2010.]
  • The McMahons own “a 4,365-square-foot Greenwich townhouse assessed at $3.13 million.” They also own “an oceanfront condominium in Boca Raton purchased for $2.145 million in 2002.” [Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010.]

The McMahons Owned a 47-Foot Speedboat Named “Sexy Bitch”

The McMahons owned a “47-foot speedboat” named the “Sexy Bitch,” which is “kept in Boca Raton.” The Hill noted that “while it’s not entirely certain just who the SB is, it’s a pretty safe guess it’s not McMahon’s husband.”

  • During her 2010 Senate campaign, McMahon owned a “47-foot speedboat” named the “Sexy Bitch.” The Hill noted that “while it’s not entirely certain just who the SB is, it’s a pretty safe guess it’s not McMahon’s husband.” [Christina Wilkie, “Linda McMahon’s Unusual Name for Her Boat Becomes Campaign Fodder,” The Hill, March 19, 2010.]
  • “Vince McMahon is the owner of a 47-foot sports yacht, ‘Sexy Bitch,’ that is kept in Boca Raton, Fla. according to U.S. Coast Guard records.” [“Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010]

The McMahons Have Owned Many Insanely Expensive and Luxury Cars, Including a $189,000 Bentley with a $100,000 Sound System

The McMahons have owned a number of expensive cars, including a “charcoal-gray Bentley Continental Coupe valued at $189,900” with a “$100,000 sound system.” They also owned a Mercedes SL600R, Bentley GT Speed, GMC Yukon X, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Volvo XC70 station wagon, and Boss Hoss BHC3 motorcycle.

  • In 2015, Vince McMahon owned a “charcoal-gray Bentley Continental Coupe valued at $189,900” with a “$100,000 sound system.” [Ben Feuerherd, “Vince McMahon’s Stolen Bentley Found in Bronx,” New York Post, March 15, 2015.]
  • In March 2010, the six vehicles were registered to the McMahons: “a 2005 Volvo XC70 station wagon; 2009 GMC Yukon X; 2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee; 2007 Mercedes SL600R; 2008 Bentley GT Speed; 2002 Boss Hoss BHC3 motorcycle.” [“Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010.]

The WWE Took Out a $31.6 Million Loan to Buy a Private Jet

The WWE took out a $31.6 million loan to buy a Bombardier Global 5000 private jet.

  • On February 3, 2014, McMahon’s daughter, Stephanie McMahon, tweeted that she was on the “Maiden voyage” of the new plane for a WWE event in Omaha. [Stephanie McMahon Twitter post, February 3, 2014, 8:36 a.m., accessed January 9, 2017.]

McMahon Spent Nearly $100 Million on Her Two Failed Candidacies for U.S. Senate

McMahon earned “national fame” for “the nearly $100 million she squandered on” her two failed Senate races.


McMahon’s 2012 Campaign Failed to Pay Workers Until They Went to the Media, Then Paid with Bad Checks and Rude Gestures

After McMahon’s second failed attempt to snag a Senate seat, campaign workers complained that “they had not been paid by” McMahon’s campaign. The campaign started “writing checks” after the complaints–but “the checks bounced.” One of the workers said that McMahon’s “campaign told him they were mad that he came to News 8” about his snubbed pay, “so he got a little something extra in his envelope.” In his own words: “‘Basically he handed me a check with a condom in it, told me I was screwed. . . . That’s the rudest gesture you can ever do to a person, it’s like spitting in a person’s face.’”

  • After the failed Senate campaign in 2012, “election campaign workers came to News 8 claiming” that “they had not been paid by Linda McMahon’s campaign.” One week after the election, after the campaign workers had publicly complained, “the campaign was writing checks. The only problem is that the checks bounced.” Annie Rourke, “Linda McMahon Campaign Worker Receives Check and Condom, Check Bounces,” WTNH-TV, November 21, 2012.]

The McMahons Filed for Bankruptcy in 1976

McMahon and her husband filed for bankruptcy in 1976 after amassing “about $1 million in debt.” The couple “also had unpaid federal taxes over five straight years that amounted to $142,763.” When the issue was publicly reported, in 2010, the McMahons were “wealthy, with an estimated net worth of up to $370 million,” but it was “unclear whether all [their] creditors were ever paid.” The couple’s “financial hardships were attributed, at least in part, to a pair of high-profile debacles promoted by Vince,” who was “working as a wrestling promoter for his father and also as a television announcer” in the mid-1970s. One “was a failed live televised jump” by Evel Knievel, where “he was saved from certain death after” his “jet-powered sled” “landed on the rocks at the” far edge of the Snake River Canyon in 1974. Vince’s other “fiasco” was “a fight in 1976 between boxing legend Muhammad Ali and Japanese professional wrestler Antonio Inoki in Tokyo,” where, after leaking Inoki’s scripted victory to reporters, Ali “threw about a half-dozen halfhearted punches in the boring, 15-round draw.’”

  • “The couple filed for personal bankruptcy in 1976 after amassing, according to the campaign, about $1 million in debt. . . . The McMahons also had unpaid federal taxes over five straight years that amounted to $142,763.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • When the issue was publicly reported in 2010, the McMahons were “wealthy, with an estimated net worth of up to $370 million,” but it was “unclear whether all her creditors were ever paid.” At that time, “no federal bankruptcy records on the matter” could be located, “including documents that would identify the McMahons’ creditors and how much they were owed. McMahon “declined requests for an interview on the subject, and neither she nor her campaign has released any records pertaining to the bankruptcy.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • The McMahons not only left “bills to creditors” unpaid. “Federal tax liens on file with the Greenwich town clerk recorded on May 17, 1984, state the McMahons owed the federal government for $142,761 in unpaid taxes for the years 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976 and 1977. Of that amount, $81,481 was for unpaid income taxes and $61,282 was for employer withholding wages. The liens were placed on a home at 21 Hedgerow Lane in Greenwich. Real estate records show the home was owned by Charles and Lea Bell.” [[Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • By February 1985, however, the McMahons “had left the hard times far behind and purchased their current home on Hurlingham Drive in the exclusive Conyers Farm section of Greenwich. The 10-acre property is valued at $11.8 million.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • According to the 2002 book Sex, Lies and Headlocks, which “chronicled the rise of the McMahons’ empire,” the couple’s “financial hardships were attributed, at least in part, to a pair of high-profile debacles promoted by Vince,” who was “working as a wrestling promoter for his father and also as a television announcer” in the mid-1970s. [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • “The first was a failed live televised jump over the Snake River Canyon in Idaho in 1974 by Evel Knievel,” which was televised by ABC. Although the “jet-powered sled driven by Knievel cleared the edge of the canyon,” “‘his parachute ejected prematurely’ and he was saved from certain death after the craft landed on the rocks at the river’s far edge, according to Wide World of Sports’ website.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • Vince McMahon then “attempted to arrange a fight in 1976 between boxing legend Muhammad Ali and Japanese professional wrestler Antonio Inoki in Tokyo.” Although there “‘had been a script’” that “‘called for Inoki to win,’” “‘that went out the window when Ali gave away the ending to reporters,’ recalled a 2007 Sports Illustrated magazine story. ‘Unable to use karate chops and flying kicks, Inoki resorted to sweeping leg kicks and, on one occasion, head-butted Ali in the groin. Ali, wearing gloves, threw about a half-dozen halfhearted punches in the boring, 15-round draw.’” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • According to Sex, Lies and Headlocks, the ticket sales to the Ali match in Tokyo “‘were only slightly better than for the Snake River fiasco. Once again, Vinnie’s big payday failed to materialize.’” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • Vince McMahon discussed “the subject in a 2001 interview with Playboy magazine,” saying, “‘I got involved with people who weren’t that bright and let them tell me that I needed tax shelters. There was a construction company, a horse farm, a cement plant, and it all went belly-up. I felt bad about the bankruptcy. I wanted to pay what I owed, but there were other people involved, and finally the banks wrote it all off.’” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]

McMahon Was Criticized for Failing to Repay Debts from Bankruptcy

McMahon was criticized, during her second failed Senate campaign, “for failing to repay all those debts, despite later making a fortune at WWE and investing more than $65 million of her own money into two campaigns for Senate.”

  • In April 1976, the McMahons declared bankruptcy “three months after the Connecticut Bank and Trust Co. foreclosed on their West Hartford home, on which they owned [sic] $133,167. The house was auctioned for $147,500 in October 1976.” [“Linda McMahon to Repay Creditors in 1976 Bankruptcy,” CBS New York, September 21, 2012.]
  • During her 2012 Senate campaign, McMahon was criticized by her Democratic opponent, Chris Murphy, “for failing to repay all those debts, despite later making a fortune at WWE and investing more than $65 million of her own money into two campaigns for Senate.” [“Linda McMahon to Repay Creditors in 1976 Bankruptcy,” CBS New York, September 21, 2012.]
  • McMahon responded with a statement “saying that after seeing the list of creditors for the first time this week, she and her husband began trying to find the ones that had not already been repaid.” [“Linda McMahon to Repay Creditors in 1976 Bankruptcy,” CBS New York, September 21, 2012.
  • “‘Over the past two days, Vince and I have begun attempts to locate and reach out to all individuals on the creditor list,’” McMahon said. “‘It is our intention to reimburse all private individual creditors that can be located. We feel it is the right thing to do to pay them in full, including an adjustment for inflation at four times the initial amount as show on the list of creditors.’” [“Linda McMahon to Repay Creditors in 1976 Bankruptcy,” CBS New York, September 21, 2012.]
  • “Murphy’s campaign criticized” McMahon’s response “as disingenuous,” with Murphy’s spokesman calling it “‘a shame that it took thirty-six years and mounting political pressure for Linda McMahon to finally pay some, but apparently not all, of her debts.’” [“Linda McMahon to Repay Creditors in 1976 Bankruptcy,” CBS New York, September 21, 2012.]

McMahon Was Criticized for Attempting to Mislead Voters into Thinking a Major Labor Union Working to Elect Barack Obama Was Also Supporting Her Candidacy

McMahon was criticized for outfitting urban-area poll workers “in purple T-shirts styled after those worn by SEIU, the liberal union that” backed McMahon’s Democratic opponent, Chris Murphy. The SEIU had “about 500 members working” on Election Day 2012 “to get out the vote for Obama and Murphy, many also wearing purple T-shirts.” McMahon’s version of the shirt, however, read, “‘I support Obama & McMahon.’” An SEIU official said McMahon “clearly” ripped off their shirts, noting that it was all part of her “‘strategy of ticket splitting.’” McMahon’s campaign manager, “Republican operative” Corry Bliss, “did not deny the similarity to SEIU garb.”

  • McMahon’s Senate campaign was criticized on Election Day, 2012, for outfitting “its urban poll standers today in purple T-shirts styled after those worn by SEIU, the liberal union that” backed McMahon’s Democratic opponent, Chris Murphy.The SEIU had “about 500 members working” on Election Day “to get out the vote for Obama and Murphy, many also wearing purple T-shirts.” The message on McMahon’s version read, “‘I support Obama & McMahon.’” The shirts were “part of an effort by McMahon to blunt the urban vote Murphy needs in Hartford, Bridgeport, and New Haven, where her workers also have left literature urging a vote for Obama and McMahon.”“Paul Filson, the political director of SEIU, which represents many minority health care workers,” said, “‘It clearly is a rip off of our shirts . . .  It definitely is confusing.’” Filson added, “‘It’s all part of their strategy of ticket splitting, no doubt about it. . . .  She doesn’t win if people don’t split their tickets, so every little thing she can do to confuse people, she is doing.’”McMahon’s campaign manager, Corry Bliss, “did not deny the similarity to SEIU garb,” saying that the campaign wanted to make sure the voices of “‘thousands of Democrats across the state of Connecticut who are supporting President Obama that are also supporting Linda McMahon’” were heard. [Mark Pazniokas, “McMahon Dresses Her City Workers Like Murphy Supporters,” Connecticut Mirror, November 6, 2012.]

The McMahons Have Known Trump for Thirty Years and Were the “Biggest Outside Donors” to the Scandal-Ridden Donald J. Trump Foundation

McMahon has known Donald Trump for thirty years, and the connections between them “run deep.” McMahon and her husband are “the biggest outside donors to” the Donald J. Trump Foundation, after contributing “a total of $5 million to” the foundation” between 2007 and 2009. McMahon later said she could “‘not remember how it came about.’” McMahon also “donated $7 million dollars to help elect” Trump, which primarily was spent on television advertising.

  • McMahon has known Donald Trump for thirty years. “Trump famously shaved Vince McMahon’s head in 2007 during a WWE match titled ‘Battle of the Billionaires.’” [Susan Haigh, “Former WWE Wrestling Executive Becoming GOP Mega Donor,” AP News, September 25, 2016.]
  • Trump was not McMahon’s “first choice for president.” She supported New Jersey Governor Chris Christie as “her admitted top choice in the Republican primary.” However, McMahon became a “strong supporter” of Trump later in his campaign, predicting that Trump will “be a good president who will surround himself with competent people. She credits him with becoming ‘a vessel that has housed this anger and this dissatisfaction’ in the country, which she said has intensified since she first ran for office” in 2010.“McMahon and her husband contributed a total of $5 million to Trump’s foundation in 2007, a donation McMahon said she did ‘not remember how it came about.’ She said she has no misgivings about making the contribution, ultimately the largest to Trump’s foundation.” [Susan Haigh, “Former WWE Wrestling Executive Becoming GOP Mega Donor,” AP News, September 25, 2016.]
  • McMahon “donated $7 million dollars to help elect” Donald Trump. She “gave $6 million over the summer to the group Rebuilding America Now, and another $1 million in October to the group Future 45,” both of which “spent money primarily on television advertising.”“Trump tapped McMahon as the leader of the Small Business Administration” in December 2016. [“Linda McMahon Donated $7 Million to Help Elect Trump,” CBS News, December 9, 2016.]

McMahon Considers Trump to Be “An Incredibly Loyal Friend”

McMahon called Trump “‘an incredibly loyal, loyal friend.’” That loyalty paid off in December 2016, when “Trump tapped McMahon as the leader of the Small Business Administration.”


McMahon Offered President-Elect Trump Early Praise, Even Though He “Didn’t Talk Enough About the Issues During . . . the Campaign”

McMahon believes that Donald Trump is “a serious businessman” and “will be a serious president,” even though he “didn’t talk enough about the issues during most of the campaign.” Just days after the election, she praised him for “hitting the ground running,” noting that he had “already spoken to President Netanyahu and invited him to come to the White House.”

  • “It’s just been ugly. The mood of the country is angry and ugly and both of these candidates, I think, just made it too personal. They didn’t talk enough about the issues during most of the campaign. The latter parts of the campaign I was very pleased to hear President-elect Trump talk about the policies and the issues and to lay out his contract with America and what he wanted and planned to do and I think you’ve seen already with his outreach, I mean, he’s already working. He’s ready to go . . . He’s already been making telephone contacts, he reached out to Nancy Pelosi yesterday, my understanding was, on the jobs bill. He’s already spoken to President Netanyahu and invited him to come to the White House early on in his presidency so he’s hitting the ground running. He’s a serious businessman and he will be a serious president” (03:45) [Rob Polansky, “Face the State: Could Linda McMahon Join Trump’s Cabinet,” WFSB video, 13.33, posted November 11, 2016.]

McMahon and Her Husband Are Republican Mega-Donors

In addition to being “the biggest outside” donor to the Trump Foundation, McMahon, with her husband, is “a sought-after Republican mega donor” who gave $9.67 million “to outside spending groups, such as super PACs,” in 2016. She “attended the Republican National Convention” and was “a frequent guest at fundraisers for federal candidates, rubbing elbows with top GOP leaders like House Speaker Paul Ryan.”

  • During the 2016 campaign cycle, McMahon “attended the Republican National Convention” and was “a frequent guest at fundraisers for federal candidates, rubbing elbows with top GOP leaders like House Speaker Paul Ryan.” [Susan Haigh, “Former WWE Wrestling Executive Becoming GOP Mega Donor,” AP News, September 25, 2016.]
  • McMahon, in 2016, “held a fundraiser at her Greenwich, Connecticut, home for Arizona Sen. John McCain, who had stumped for the former CEO of WWE during her 2010 and 2012 Senate campaigns.” [Susan Haigh, “Former WWE Wrestling Executive Becoming GOP Mega Donor,” AP News, September 25, 2016.]
  • “McMahon also hosted an event for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, her admitted top choice in the Republican primary. Records show she contributed $550,000 to America Leads, a super PAC that supported Christie’s candidacy.” [Susan Haigh, “Former WWE Wrestling Executive Becoming GOP Mega Donor,” AP News, September 25, 2016.]
  • The Center for Responsive Politics ranked McMahon and her husband as 20th among their list of “so-called ‘mega donors’ contributing in this election cycle to outside spending groups, such as super PACs.” They gave $9.67 million to outside groups and super PACs. In 2014, the McMahons were ranked 19th on the same list, giving $2.74 million to outside spending groups. [Susan Haigh, “Former WWE Wrestling Executive Becoming GOP Mega Donor,” AP News, September 25, 2016; and “2016 Top Donors to Outside Spending Groups,“ Center for Responsive Politics website, accessed January 9, 2017.]
  • In December 2013, McMahon was “welcomed into the fold of billionaire donors clustered around New York hedge fund mogul Paul Singer” when she attended an “event organized for the Singer-backed joint fundraising committee Friends for an American Majority, which has routed big sums of money to GOP Senate candidates in four states. McMahon again joined Singer and his finance-oriented cohort for a February donor retreat in Aspen, mingling with powerful Washington figures including House Speaker John Boehner.” [Alexander Burns, “McMahon Reemerges as Mega-Donor,” Politico, May 22, 2014.]]

McMahon is “Notoriously Media Shy,” Especially When Asked to Explain the Details Surrounding Her Bankruptcy Filing in 1976, and Five Years of Unpaid Taxes Amounting to over $140K

McMahon is “notoriously media shy” and has drawn criticism for avoiding the media. McMahon “canceled an interview with a local columnist that her own PR team had set up” and “declined to sit for editorial board meetings during her 2012 primary.” When her bankruptcy and financial problems from the mid-1970s were reported on during her failed Senate campaign in 2010, McMahon “declined requests for an interview on the subject” and refused to release “any records pertaining to the bankruptcy.” However, she mentioned her bankruptcy “in her advertising and during interviews” and was criticized for reaping “the benefits of sharing her story,” without fully explaining “the circumstances to voters.” 

  • McMahon is “notoriously media shy,” according to a 2015 Roll Call She “recently canceled an interview with a local columnist that her own PR team had set up” and “declined to sit for editorial board meetings during her 2012 primary.” [Simone Pathé, “Failed but not Forgotten, Linda McMahon Keeps Hand in GOP,” Roll Call, July 17, 2015.]
  • McMahon “chose not to respond to” a candidate questionnaire by the Connecticut Post during her first failed Senate campaign in 2010. [“Linda McMahon,” Connecticut Post, March 14, 2010.]
  • When their bankruptcy and financial problems were reported in 2010, the McMahons were “wealthy, with an estimated net worth of up to $370 million,” but it was “unclear whether all [their] creditors were ever paid.” The couple had filed for bankruptcy in 1976 after amassing “about $1 million in debt.” The couple “also had unpaid federal taxes over five straight years that amounted to $142,763.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • McMahon “declined requests for an interview on the subject, and neither she nor her campaign has released any records pertaining to the bankruptcy.” Her campaign also “declined to say whether all of the debts were paid or if the McMahons felt a moral obligation to make good on those bills once their business fortunes took a dramatic upswing in the early 1980s.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • However, McMahon used the bankruptcy “in her advertising and during interviews” and was criticized for reaping “the benefits of sharing her story,” without fully explaining “the circumstances to voters.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]
  • “‘I’ve gone from bankruptcy at the beginning of my career, of losing my home, losing cars, not (being) able to get any credit, to rebuilding, and now having a company that grew from a small family business, you know, to a global brand,’ McMahon told ABC News in January [2010], referring to the family’s Stamford-based World Wrestling Entertainment.” [Brian Lockhart, “McMahon’s Bankruptcy a Murky Chapter in Her Rags-to-Riches Tale,” Connecticut Post, October 1, 2010.]

McMahon Doesn’t Think Women Should Be Concerned about Trump’s “Deplorable” Comments about Women

Although she called his “comments about women ‘deplorable’ during the GOP primary,” McMahon now believes that women should not be concerned that Donald Trump “alienated” them during the campaign. She said Trump “has a great deal of respect for women even though you wouldn’t have known it by some of the things that he’s said on the campaign trail.”

  • In a November 2016 television interview, McMahon was asked about how Donald Trump “alienated” women and whether women should be concerned. She replied, “No. Donald Trump has many women who work in his companies and his businesses. He has a great deal of respect for women even though you wouldn’t have known it by some of the things that he’s said on the campaign trail, as I said, which I thought were just totally over-the-top. So did his daughter. So did his wife. And so did the women in his organization that I know very well. It’s not the Donald Trump I’ve known and had experience with”(08:53). [Rob Polansky, “Face the State: Could Linda McMahon Join Trump’s Cabinet,” WFSB video, 13.33, posted November 11, 2016.]

McMahon Is Not Well-Versed in Major Tax-Policy Issues

Although her “hometown is often referred to as the hedge fund capital,” McMahon was not well-versed “on the topic of hedge fund taxation” in 2009. She was unable to answer a question on “whether ‘carried interest,’ profits earned by managers of the investment pools, should continue to be taxed as capital gains at 15 percent or as personal income at up to 35 percent.” McMahon also “sidestepped a question on hedge fund regulation,” saying, “‘I just think we have a lot of good rules and regulations that apply to the market, and I don’t want to comment on hedge funds in particular.’”

  • “McMahon was less versed on the topic of hedge fund taxation and specifically the question of whether ‘carried interest,’ profits earned by managers of the investment pools, should continue to be taxed as capital gains at 15 percent or as personal income at up to 35 percent,” and “sidestepped a question on hedge fund regulation.” [Neil Vigdor, “Linda McMahon: Can She Shake the WWE Image?” Connecticut Post, December 20, 2009.]
  • “‘Well, I just think we have a lot of good rules and regulations that apply to the market, and I don’t want to comment on hedge funds in particular,’ said McMahon, whose hometown is often referred to as the hedge fund capital.” [Neil Vigdor, “Linda McMahon: Can She Shake the WWE Image?” Connecticut Post, December 20, 2009.]

McMahon Admitted “She Did Not Know the Current Minimum Wage or If Anyone at” WWE Was Earning It

While accepting the endorsement of the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB), “a small business organization that opposes any increase in the federal minimum wage,” McMahon “admitted she did not know the current minimum wage or if anyone at” her company, WWE, was earning the minimum wage.


McMahon Tried to Have It Both Ways on Government Bailouts (TARP)

McMahon was accused “of contradicting herself on government bailouts” in 2009, which she assailed in her Senate campaign ads. However, McMahon allegedly also “spoke of the need for Congress to approve the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program” (TARP). McMahon said she “‘would have voted for TARP to rescue the banks and have our economy be stabilized,’” but that she “‘clearly understood,’” and thought “‘most everyone’” understood, that the money “‘would not be used  . . . as a credit line for bailouts of automobile companies or AIGs.’” The Congressional Budget Office estimated that TARP would cost taxpayers “about $14 billion” in unrecovered funds.

  • In 2009, former U.S. Representative Rob Simmons, who faced the possibility of being “matched up against McMahon in a GOP Senate primary,” accused McMahon “of contradicting herself on government bailouts, which she assails in her campaign ads.” According to Simmons’ aides, however, “McMahon spoke of the need for Congress to approve the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program” “in an interview with a West Hartford weekly newspaper.” [Neil Vigdor, “Linda McMahon: Can She Shake the WWE Image?” Connecticut Post, December 20, 2009.]
  • “McMahon offered a clarification. ‘From everything we knew, the country was on the brink of economic collapse if we didn’t do something and rescue the banks,’” she said. “‘So based on that, I would have voted for TARP to rescue the banks and have our economy be stabilized. However, it was clearly understood by me, and I think by most everyone, that the money then that would be paid back would reduce the debt of TARP, and it would not be used then as a credit line for bailouts of automobile companies or AIGs. Those are the bailouts that I absolutely would not have supported.’” [Neil Vigdor, “Linda McMahon: Can She Shake the WWE Image?” Connecticut Post, December 20, 2009.]
  • The Treasury Department reported that TARP “cost taxpayers $79.7 billion, of which $70.4 billion was recovered. Under that estimate, the program lost about $9.3 billion.” In April 2014, “the Congressional Budget Office estimated that the program would end up costing about $14 billion.” [Steve Contorno, “Obama Says Automakers Have Paid Back All the Loans It Got from His Admin ‘and More,’” PolitiFact, January 22, 2015.]

McMahon Wants to Cut Corporate Taxes and Regulations

McMahon supported “a lower corporate tax rate and a reduction in regulations.” President-elect “Trump has proposed chopping the corporate tax rate to 15 percent from 35 percent and drastically rolling back regulations.”


McMahon Thinks Social Security Is Going “Bankrupt” and Should Be Reassessed

McMahon supports sunset provisions for Social Security.

  • McMahon was criticized in her 2012 campaign for saying she wanted to put a sunset provision on Social Security at a Tea Party event. Her campaign defended her, saying “’she didn’t mean sunset in terms of what most people typically think of a sunset provision.’” [Mark Pazniokas, “Murphy: McMahon Would ‘Phase Out Social Security,’” Connecticut Mirror, September 27, 2012.]
  • “We cannot continue doing things the way we’re doing with Social Security. We’re just simply going to be bankrupt. And I do believe that there are ways, what were we trying to do when we put Social Security in place? We didn’t go back and review it. In other words, I believe in sunset provisions when we pass this kind of legislation so that you take a look at it ten, fifteen years down the road”(09:38). [Myviewmyeye YouTube channel, “CT 2nd District TPP Meet & Greet 4/20/2012 Part 3 of 10,” YouTube video, 11:08, posted April 21, 2012.]

McMahon Says She Is “Pro-Choice” but Supports Many Restrictions on the Procedure

McMahon is “‘pro-choice’” but “supports a ban on partial-birth or late-term abortions, as well as a parental notification requirement.”

  • In 2009, “McMahon identified herself as being ‘pro-choice,’ but said she supports a ban on partial-birth or late-term abortions, as well as a parental notification requirement.” [Neil Vigdor, “Linda McMahon: Can She Shake the WWE Image?” Connecticut Post, December 20, 2009.]

McMahon Is against Marriage Equality

McMahon believes marriage is “between a man and a woman.”

  • On The View, McMahon said that marriage is “between a man and a woman” (02:00). [Linda McMahon’s YouTube channel, “Linda McMahon on The View,” YouTube video, 6:13, posted January 21, 2010.]

McMahon Thinks Employers Should Be Able to Deny Employees Health Care That Covers Birth Control

McMahon supported the Blunt amendment, which would have “vastly” expanded “conscience exemptions to the Obama administration’s new birth control coverage rule.” McMahon, who supported the Blunt amendment, said “it was about overreach of government and the separation of church and state.” McMahon said she “will always support, clearly, the separation of church and state.”

  • The “amendment proposed by Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) to a highway funding bill” would have “vastly” expanded “conscience exemptions to the Obama administration’s new birth control coverage rule.” The amendment “would have allowed not only religious groups but any employer with moral objections to opt out of the coverage requirement. And it would have allowed such employers to do so in the case of not only contraception but any health service required by the 2010 health-care law.” [N.C. Aizenman and Rosalind S. Helderman, “Birth Control Exemption Bill, the ‘Blunt Amendment,’ Killed in Senate,” Washington Post, March 1, 2012.]

McMahon Wants to “Roll Back” Dodd-Frank Which Was Put in Place After the Financial Crisis to Keep Wall Street from Tanking the Economy Again

McMahon wants to “roll back our over-burdensome regulations,” including Dodd-Frank, which she says has a “squeezing effect.”

  • McMahon said she wants to (03:15) “roll back our over-burdensome regulations,” and gives the example of Dodd Frank, which she describes as having a “squeezing effect”(03:15). [Metro Hartford Alliance Youtube channel, “MetroHartford Alliance Luncheon with U.S. Candidate Linda McMahon,” YouTube video, 10:27, posted November 2, 2012.]

At McMahon’s WWE, Wrestlers End Careers without Health or Retirement Benefits–Many with Crippling Disabilities–Despite Making the McMahons Wildly Wealthy

  • “In his heyday, Allen Ray Sarven appeared regularly on the World Wrestling Entertainment circuit, flattening opponents with diving leg drops from atop the ropes. But years of bounding around the ring took a toll, leaving Mr. Sarven with neurological damage that caused numbness on his right side, hearing loss and memory problems. Eventually, Mr. Sarven, 46, met the fate of other wrestlers considered no longer of use to the W.W.E.: his contract was not renewed and he was eliminated from the company’s wrestling roster—with no health insurance or retirement benefits to show for his years in the ring.” Vince and Linda E. McMahon have built the WWE “into a $1.2 billion empire operating in 145 countries. But along the way, the McMahons have become known for hard-nosed tactics and have been accused of putting profits ahead of the well-being of the wrestlers who attract millions of fans with their daredevil stunts and cartoonishly sculpted physiques . . . ‘It is a very financially successful company,’ said Dave Meltzer, the editor of Wrestling Observer Newsletter, which covers the industry. ‘But, boy, there were a lot of bodies discarded in the building of that company.’” [Raymond Hernandez and Joshua Brustein, “A Senate Run Brings Wrestling into Spotlight,” New York Times, July 15, 2010.]

McMahon Wrote Confidential Memo Urging Company Executives to Warn Steroid Doc About Criminal Investigation

  • In 1989, Linda McMahon sent “a confidential memo to a fellow executive at Titan Sports” warning that the WWF “should alert Dr. George T. Zahorian III that a criminal investigation could be heading his way” regarding his alleged sales of steroids. The doctor was ultimately convicted and sentenced to three years in prison for the distribution of steroids. McMahon’s husband Vince and the company were also charged with possession with intent to distribute steroids but the charges were dropped due to a legal technicality. [Ted Mann, “McMahon Warned Steroid Doctor of Investigation,” The (New London, CT) Day April 9, 2010.]

McMahon Told Congress Her Company Stopped Steroid Testing Wrestlers Because It “Was Not Cost Effective”

  • Linda McMahon testified before Congress that the WWE stopped its steroid testing program in 1996 “because there were so few positive tests” and that “her husband suspended the program because ‘It was not cost effective.’” The years 1996 through 2005 were “a 10-year period when the WWE had no broad- based drug-testing policy, even though several wrestlers who had been linked to anabolic steroids and other drugs died during that time. It wasn’t until after the death of Eddie Guerrero in 2005 that a policy was put in place that reinstated drug testing, first done between 1991 and 1996.” [Ed Stannard, “Steroid Stain Lingers on McMahon’s WWE: U.S. Senate Candidate May Take Hit over Drug Controversy,” (Torrington, CT) Register Citizen, June 20, 2010.]

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